Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy Review

Screen Shot 2015-09-08 at 9.42.10 PM
Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a very slow, underrated, paranoia based spy film. This is a film I’ll probably have to re-watch in order to fully comprehend it, an intelligent, realistic spy film that puts you in a weird position where it almost feels like you’re spying on the characters, continuous close-ups and beautiful camera work adds a whole new dimension to this spy thriller. From the initial shot to very last shot, Hoyte Van Hoytema presents us, yet again with gorgeous visuals that immerse you into the film-viewing experience. Then the pairing of Alfredson’s distinct style with Hoytema’s visual style presents us with a really immersive, strained story that will have you at the end of your seat the whole time. With probably the greatest British ensemble cast of all time, from blond Cumberbatch to blond Hardy, from old-looking Oldman to John Hurt, we’re presented with nuanced performances that work perfectly for the film as everyone is on the same level of greatness, you never know who the mole might end up being. Well, actually there is someone who stands-out, then again he stands-out in practically every film he’s in, Gary Oldman is perfect as Smiley, assuming a position of coolness and sadness, meanwhile reserving an angry side of him which he occasionally lets out with certain gazes and facial expressions. Like Moon, I would like to maintain Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy intact by not going into the plot, letting you as a viewer to decipher the film. In conclusion, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is an intelligent, underrated, tense spy-thriller with a triumphant finally, ranking at an 80 out of 100.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s